Working In These Times

Tuesday, Apr 7, 2020, 2:41 pm  ·  By Chris Brooks

Exclusive Transcripts Show Disgraced UAW President Strongarmed Board To Pick His Own Successor

Gary Jones, then the newly-elected President of the United Auto Workers (UAW), addresses the 37th UAW Constitutional Convention June14, 2018 at Cobo Center in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Bill Pugliano/Getty Images)  

This story is part of an ongoing collaboration between In These Times and Labor Notes.

Faced with an ongoing corruption scandal that might lead to a government takeover, United Auto Workers President Rory Gamble has presented himself as representing a clean break from the union’s crooked inner circle, someone who can unite a fractured union and restore members’ trust after the UAW’s top leaders spent years stealing from the union and taking millions in employer payouts in exchange for concessions.

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Tuesday, Apr 7, 2020, 9:03 am  ·  By Hamilton Nolan

Striking McDonald’s Workers Say Their Lives Are More Essential Than Fast Food

McDonald's employees and supporters protest outside a McDonald's in Los Angeles, California, April 6, 2020 demanding pay for quarantine time and healthcare for workers who get sick from the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. (Photo by ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images)  

The fast food industry has long insulated itself from organized labor by building a legal wall between the parent company and the individual franchised stores. That imaginary separation is being tested by the reality of the coronavirus pandemic, as McDonald’s workers across the country have held strikes and walked out, unwilling to risk their lives for fries with no safety net.

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Monday, Apr 6, 2020, 11:14 am  ·  By Hamilton Nolan

The Plan Is to Save Capital and Let the People Die

People watch the arrival of the USNS Comfort Ship on March 30, 2020 in New York as seen from Weehawken, New Jersey. The naval hospital has 1,000 beds and 12 operating rooms. The Comfort will not treat Covid-19 patients. (Photo by Kena Betancur/ VIEWpress via Getty Images)  

Fantasize for a moment that we could set aside politics and operate based upon common sense. What would the federal government do to best mitigate the devastation that this pandemic will visit upon human beings? It would, first of all, provide free healthcare to everyone. It would distribute medical resources nationally based on the greatest need. Then, to protect people from the necessary economic deep freeze we are all in due to social distancing, the government would pursue measures that would get everyone through this time in one piece: It would subsidize the nation’s payrolls, so that workers could stay in their jobs and businesses could restart easily; it would suspend rent, for people and businesses alike; it would send everyone a monthly basic income to pay for necessities until this is over; and it would avoid allowing small businesses to go bankrupt, because those represent millions of jobs that people need to return to.

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Thursday, Apr 2, 2020, 12:51 pm  ·  By Sara Nelson

Mnuchin Is Now Trying to Destroy Airline Workers’ Job Protections

Protections for airline workers should be the standard for all workers. (Photo by Drew Angerer/Getty Images)  

America’s aviation workers won a huge victory in the CARES Act. In the bill, Congress created a grants program that funds paychecks and benefits for two million hourly workers who were going to lose their jobs while planes are grounded. This isn’t a no-strings-attached corporate bailout for airlines. The money goes directly to flight attendants, pilots, mechanics, cleaners, caterers, and wheelchair attendants, so that we can stay on the job, on our healthcare, and out of the unemployment line. It should be a model for how we help all workers impacted by coronavirus.

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Wednesday, Apr 1, 2020, 9:13 am  ·  By Hamilton Nolan

Here’s What a General Strike Would Take

Striking building workers raise their fists in salute during a rally in the Bois de Vincennes, Paris, 13th June 1936. (Photo by Keystone/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)  

You know that things are getting serious when #GeneralStrike starts trending on Twitter. It happened last week, when Donald Trump was publicly mulling the idea of sending Americans back to work by Easter, a move that would imperil countless lives. A general strike has long held a strong utopian allure. But what would it take to actually pull one off? We spoke to the experts about the reality behind the dream.

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Wednesday, Apr 1, 2020, 7:02 am  ·  By Mindy Isser

Workers Are Essential, CEOs Are Not

Workers re-stock items during special hours open only to seniors and the disabled at Northgate Gonzalez Market, a Hispanic specialty supermarket, on March 19, 2020 in Los Angeles, California. (Mario Tama / Getty)  

First published at Jacobin.

Low-wage workers are on the front line in the battle against coronavirus. While many workers have started telecommuting — and many others have unfortunately been laid off — low-wage workers are busy cleaning our streets, making sure we have enough to eat, and, of course, nursing us back to health if we get COVID-19. Despite being linchpins of a functional society, these workers are often treated as expendable or dismissed as “unskilled.” But over the past few weeks, we’ve seen just how irreplaceable they are.

In California, New York, Illinois, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and elsewhere, state governments have rolled out increasingly strict orders to enforce social distancing and close all businesses except those deemed “essential” or “life-sustaining.” While these lists vary from state to state, each includes grocery stores, laundromats, restaurants (serving takeout and delivery), factories that produce foodstuffs and other products, gas stations, pharmacies, and hospitals.

What do all of these businesses have in common? They rely on the labor of low-wage workers who, in many cases, toil without benefits, unions, and workplace protections. Public workers are still on the clock, too, cleaning our streets, delivering our mail, and making sure we have access to utilities and other social services. While many government workers have unions, they are often accorded the same lack of respect as their low-wage, private-sector counterparts.

But imagine a global pandemic without postal workers or UPS drivers getting us our messages and packages; without cashiers and stockers keeping grocery stores up and running and full of food; without care and domestic workers providing life-saving medical and emotional support to some of society’s most at-risk people; without utility workers making sure we have a supply of water, electricity, and gas; without laundromat workers enabling us to clean our clothes, towels, and sheets; without sanitation workers collecting our trash and slowing the spread of germs.

While many individuals have expressed appreciation for these frontline workers — leaving hand sanitizer out for their letter carrier; calling for an increase in teachers’ salaries after having to homeschool their kids for a few days — our society has long undervalued them, both monetarily and otherwise. That’s starting to change, thanks to the crisis and worker organizing that has turned up the heat on bosses.

Minnesota, Michigan, and Vermont have all classified grocery store employees as emergency workers, making them eligible for childcare and other services. Stop & Shop workers have received a 10 percent pay increase and two additional weeks of paid sick leave. Safeway, Target, and Whole Foods workers won a $2-per-hour increase. And unionized workers at Kroger in Washington state have been given hazard pay, a demand taken up by many grocery and other frontline workers across the country. These victories, while small, have inched us closer to a society where low-wage workers finally get the remuneration and respect they deserve.

But what does it say about our country when the jobs that are most critical to sustaining life at its basic level are also some of the lowest paid and least valued? Grocery store workers and first responders are exposing themselves to a massive health crisis in order to keep the rest of us functioning as normally as possible. Many of them work for minimum wage or close to it — and without health benefits — meaning that they could contract coronavirus and get stuck with either a massive bill or no health care at all. Meanwhile, with many school districts closed indefinitely, parents are missing the critical and challenging work done every day by nannies, childcare workers, and educators of all kinds.

These workers have a right to higher wages, full benefits, health and safety guarantees, and strong unions — just like every other worker.

Hopefully, this crisis will not only elevate the status of low-wage workers but spark a new wave of organizing to boost standards and build power across these “essential” industries. Because it’s low-wage workers — not bankers, landlords, or CEOs — who make our society run.

In These Times is proud to feature content from Jacobin, a print quarterly that offers socialist perspectives on politics and economics. Support Jacobin and buy a subscription for just $29.95.

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Monday, Mar 30, 2020, 1:33 pm  ·  By Mindy Isser

Garbage Collectors’ Lives Are Not Disposable

A trash collector works on April 20, 2017 in Huntington, West Virginia. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images)  

The coronavirus pandemic is ravaging our country, manifesting both as a health crisis and a jobs crisis. While the unemployment rate could soar to 30%, many workers whose industries are generally ignored or disrespected have been deemed essential, and have been putting themselves in harm’s way to keep our society functioning.

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Monday, Mar 30, 2020, 10:47 am  ·  By Hamilton Nolan

Fatalistic Grocery Workers Demand Hazard Pay, Saying “Infection Is Inevitable”

A sign posted in front of a Trader Joe's reminds shoppers of purchase limits as a woman wearing a facemask due to the coronavirus epidemic enters the store on March 18, 2020 in Monrovia, California. (Photo by FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP via Getty Images)  

Grocery store employees find themselves the subject of widespread public acclaim for continuing to work during the coronavirus crisis. But front-line workers at grocery chains across the country say they want something more tangible than congratulations: hazard pay. And they are winning it with spontaneous organizing campaigns forged in the crucible of a national crisis.

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Thursday, Mar 26, 2020, 1:20 pm  ·  By Hamilton Nolan

Working or Unemployed, Construction Workers Are Screwed

A Construction worker takes care of traffic as they build a new tower on March 26, 2020 in New York City. (Photo by Eduardo Munoz Alvarez/Getty Images)  

With no firm national standards about shutting down construction projects as the coronavirus stalks the nation, building trade unions and their members are facing a grim multidimensional crisis: high unemployment, faltering pensions, lost benefits, plummeting dues revenue—and, for those who do remain on the job, the constant question of whether they should quit in order to protect their health.

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Wednesday, Mar 25, 2020, 10:52 am  ·  By Rebecca Burns

Warehouse Workers Suspect Amazon’s Promise of PTO for Part-Time Employees Is a Bait-and-Switch

Amazon.com founder and CEO Jeff Bezos presents the company's first smartphone, the Fire Phone, on June 18, 2014 in Seattle, Washington (Photo by David Ryder/Getty Images)  

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, Amazon has rolled out a new policy that extends paid time off to thousands of part-time operations employees.

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